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Porsche 911 Carrera 992

For decades, the “style” inside Style Porsche, the modern-day name for the company’s automotive design department, was to attribute credit for various cars to the department and its chiefs. Tony Lapine long received praise for the startling 928. Harm Lagaay was acknowledged for the 993, 986, and 996 siblings. But interviews with both men over a period of 20 years let the truth out, sometimes with a laugh attached. “The 928?” Lapine said, always one to answer one question with another. “No, that was Wolfgang Möbius. My job was to stand at the door and not let anyone in to distract my guys from their work.” Lagaay released concept sketches showing Grant Larson’s name under Boxster concepts and production models, Pinky Lai’s name alongside 996 sketches, Tony Hatter with GT1 and Carrera GT ideas, and Steve Murkett with his vision of the Cayenne. He reiterated Lapine’s characterization as often being the door guard and staff protector. Modern-day design chief Michael Mauer followed a similar path. After an initial “You know, it really is a team effort,” the name of 991 stylist Peter Varga slipped out. It was Varga’s aggressive rear character line that redefined the 911. Harm Lagaay described other responsibilities of the design chief, such as maintaining his designers’ focus with a well-timed comment or a discussion here and there, keeping peace among them, providing them inspiration and motivation, and otherwise ensuring them a proper atmosphere in which to do their work. Each of these men did a great deal more, guiding and directing design through deft gestures and thoughtfully chosen words, through rhetorical questions and sometimes suggestions that minute adjustment of a single line might be worth a look. The ability to draw can be less necessary than possessing the skill to communicate, to articulate, to motivate. Which prompts a glance back into history: was there a Wolfgang Möbius, a Grant Larson, or a Tony Hatter on Ferdinand Alexander Porsche’s design staff? Did F. A. Porsche serve one of those roles himself, working as designer under someone else’s supervision? Did this set a pattern and a precedent for those who followed him into the job of design boss at Porsche? The direct answer to these questions is yes. What you read here may contradict what you know about Porsche 911 history. Some of this information simply was not available before now.

For decades, the “style” inside Style Porsche, the modern-day name for the company’s automotive design department, was to attribute credit for various cars to the department and its chiefs. Tony Lapine long received praise for the startling 928. Harm Lagaay was acknowledged for the 993, 986, and 996 siblings. But interviews with both men over a period of 20 years let the truth out, sometimes with a laugh attached. “The 928?” Lapine said, always one to answer one question with another. “No, that was Wolfgang Möbius. My job was to stand at the door and not let anyone in to distract my guys from their work.” Lagaay released concept sketches showing Grant Larson’s name under Boxster concepts and production models, Pinky Lai’s name alongside 996 sketches, Tony Hatter with GT1 and Carrera GT ideas, and Steve Murkett with his vision of the Cayenne. He reiterated Lapine’s characterization as often being the door guard and staff protector. Modern-day design chief Michael Mauer followed a similar path. After an initial “You know, it really is a team effort,” the name of 991 stylist Peter Varga slipped out. It was Varga’s aggressive rear character line that redefined the 911. Harm Lagaay described other responsibilities of the design chief, such as maintaining his designers’ focus with a well-timed comment or a discussion here and there, keeping peace among them, providing them inspiration and motivation, and otherwise ensuring them a proper atmosphere in which to do their work. Each of these men did a great deal more, guiding and directing design through deft gestures and thoughtfully chosen words, through rhetorical questions and sometimes suggestions that minute adjustment of a single line might be worth a look. The ability to draw can be less necessary than possessing the skill to communicate, to articulate, to motivate. Which prompts a glance back into history: was there a Wolfgang Möbius, a Grant Larson, or a Tony Hatter on Ferdinand Alexander Porsche’s design staff? Did F. A. Porsche serve one of those roles himself, working as designer under someone else’s supervision? Did this set a pattern and a precedent for those who followed him into the job of design boss at Porsche?
The direct answer to these questions is yes. What you read here may contradict what you know about Porsche 911 history. Some of this information simply was not available before now.

Engine
Engine layoutRear-engine
Configuration / number of cylindersHorizontally opposed 6 cylinder
Displacement3,996 cm³
Power383 kW
Power520 PS
Maximum power at RPM8,400 1/min
Max. torque470 Nm
Maximum torque at RPM6,250 1/min
Maximum engine speed9,000 1/min
Valve timingVarioCam camshaft control for intake and exhaust valves, DLC-Coated rocker arm, fixed valve train (valve compensation with Shims)
Emissions (NEDC Equivalent)*
CO2 emissions* combined303 g/km
Emission standardEuro 6d-TEMP-EVAP-ISC
Particulate filterGasoline particulate filter
Chassis and suspension
Front axleMcPherson front axle with lightweight springs (incl. helper springs), anti-roll bar, all Suspension mountings ball-jointed
Rear axleMulti-link rear axle with lightweight springs (incl. helper springs), anti-roll bar, all Suspension mountings ball-jointed
Brakes6-piston aluminium monobloc fixed brake calipers at front and 4-piston units at rear, brake calipers with red finish, Composite brake discs, discs internally vented and cross-drilled
SteeringElectromechanical power-assisted steering with variable steering ratio
Stability systemsPorsche Stability Management (PSM) incl. ABS, with 2 switchable stages (SC OFF and SC+TC OFF)
Wheels: Brief description20 / 21-inch 911 GT3 RS forged alloy wheels
Wheels front9.5 J x 20" ET 50
Tyres front265/35 ZR 20 sports tyres
Wheels rear12.5 J x 21" ET 48
Tyres rear325/30 ZR 21 sports tyres
Limited-slip differential - rear axlePorsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus) incl. electronically controlled rear differential lock and fully variable locking values
Performance
Top speed193 mph
Acceleration from 0-62 mph (0-100 km/h)3.2 s
Body dimensions and weights
Length4,557 mm
Width (without mirrors folded)1,978 mm
Width (with mirrors folded)1,880 mm
Height1,297 mm
Wheelbase2,453 mm
Unladen weight (DIN)1,430 kg
Unladen weight (EC)1,505 kg
Permissible gross weight1,793 kg
Maximum payload363 kg
Capacities
Luggage compartment volume (front)125 litres
Fuel tank64 litre
Service and Warranty
Warranty period3 years
Main service interval12,000 miles / 2 years
Recommended Retail Price
PDKFor more information on pricing and availability, please contact your Centre *